The Secret Protocol

Germany and the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics, Secret Additional Protocol to the Treaty of Non-Aggression. August 23, 1939

 

Original Source: Voprosy istorii, No. 1 (1993), p. 6.

ON THE occasion of the signature of the Non-Aggression Pact between the German Reich and the Union of Socialist Soviet Republics the undersigned plenipotentiaries of each of the two parties discussed in strictly confidential conversations the question of the boundary of their respective spheres of influence in Eastern Europe. These conversations led to the following conclusions:

1. In the event of a territorial and political rearrangement in areas belonging to the Baltic States (Finland, Estonia, Latvia, Lithuania), the northern boundary of Lithuania shall represent the boundary of the spheres of influence of Germany and the USSR In this connection the interest of Lithuania in the Vilna area is recognized by each party.

2. In the event of a territorial and political rearrangement of the areas belonging to the Polish state the spheres of influence of Germany and the USSR shall be bounded approximately by the line of the rivers Narew, Vistula, and San.

The question of whether the interests of both parties make desirable the maintenance of an independent Polish state and how such a state should be bounded can only be definitely determined in the course of further political developments.

In any event both Governments will resolve this question by means of a friendly agreement.

3. With regard to Southeastern Europe attention is called by the Soviet side to its interest in Bessarabia. The German side declares its complete political disinterestedness in these areas.

4. This protocol shall be treated by both parties as strictly secret.

Moscow, August 23, 1939.

For the Government of the German Reich: V. RIBBENTROP
Plenipotentiary of the Government of the USSR: V. MOLOTOV

Source:
Raymond James Sontag and James Stuart Beddie, eds., Nazi-Soviet relations, 1939-1941; documents from the archives of the German Foreign Office as released by the Dept. of State (New York: Didier, 1948), pp. 78-79.

 

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