Tashkent Declaration

The Tashkent Declaration. January 10, 1966

 

The leaders of India and Pakistan met in Soviet Uzbekistan to negotiate an end to the fighting which had broken out between their two countries in 1965. They both expressed their appreciation to Soviet arbitrators, including Alexei Kosygin, ”for their constructive, friendly, and noble role” in sponsoring and hosting the meeting. The world public opinion value of this Soviet action was substantial, especially in the third world. The declaration follows in full.

Original Source: Pravda, 11 January 1966, p. 1

The prime minister of India and the president of Pakistan … state their firm determination to restore normal and peaceful relations between their countries and to promote mutual understanding and friendly relations between their peoples. They regard the achievement of these goals as vitally important for the prosperity of the 600 million people of India and Pakistan.

I. The prime minister of India and the president of Pakistan agree that the two sides should apply all efforts for the creation of good-neighborly relations between India and Pakistan in conformity with the charter of the United Nations. They affirm their commitment in accordance with the charter not to resort to force and to resolve their disputes by peaceful means. They agreed that the continuation of tensions between the two sides does not correspond to the interests of peace in their region… In this regard, Jammu and Kashmir were discussed and each of the sides set forth its respective position.

II. The prime minister of India and the president of Pakistan agreed that all the armed personnel of both countries will withdraw not later than 25 February 1966 to the positions which they occupied before 5 August 1965, and both sides will observe the conditions of cease-fire on the line of cease-fire.

Ill. The prime minister of India and the president of Pakistan agreed that relations between India and Pakistan will be constructed on the basis of the principle of nonintervention in the internal affairs of one another.

IV. The prime minister of India and the president of Pakistan agreed that both sides will not encourage any propaganda directed against the other side…

V. The prime minister of India and the president of Pakistan agreed that the high commissioner of India in Pakistan and the high commissioner of Pakistan in India return to their posts and normal activity of the diplomatic missions of both countries be resumed.

VI. The prime minister of India and the president of Pakistan agreed to examine measures for the resumption of economic and trade relations, communications, cultural exchanges, and also to take steps for the fulfillment of existing agreements between India and Pakistan.

VII. The prime minister of India and the president of Pakistan agreed … to carry out the repatriation of prisoners.

VIII. The prime minister of India and the president of Pakistan agreed that the sides will continue the discussion of questions connected with the problem of refugees and illegal immigration… They further agreed to discuss the question of the return of property and assets in the possession of both sides as a result of the conflict.

IX The prime minister of India and the president of Pakistan agreed that meetings will be continued between the sides both on the very highest and on other levels regarding questions which directly concern both countries. Both sides recognize the necessity to create joint Indo-Pakistani organs, which will present reports to their governments on making decisions regarding what further steps should be undertaken.

The prime minister of India and the president of Pakistan declare their feelings of deep gratitude and thanks to the leaders of the Soviet Union, the Soviet government and personally to the chairman of the Council of Ministers of the USSR for their constructive, friendly, and noble role in the organization of this meeting, which led to the mutually satisfactory results. They express also to the government and friendly people of Uzbekistan their sincere thanks for their kindly reception and their generous hospitality.

They invite the chairman of the Council of Ministers of the USSR to witness this declaration.

(Signed) Prime Minister of India, Dal Bahadur SHASTRI

President of Pakistan, Mohammed AIYUB KHAN

TASHKENT, 10 January 1966

Source: Vladimir Wozniuk, ed., Understanding Soviet Foreign Policy: readings and documents (New York: McGraw-Hill, 1990), p. 174.

 

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